[Fix] Error “Cannot find Script file” in C:\ProgramData Folder

cannot find script file in ProgramData folder

When you login to your computer, the following error or similar one may appear every time.

Can not find script file C:\ProgramData\{793391F4-29B5-4072-9833-30F048B1E37E}\1.9.3.1\rolo.txt

This entry was added by a malware, where the {GUID} string and the script file names are random and varies for each system. In the aftermath of malware removal, the above error appears when you logon to your user account. That’s because the Startup entry or Scheduled Task still exists, pointing to the missing file.

There are many ways to identify the offending task and remove it. One of the easiest ways is to use Autoruns.

Autoruns is an advanced startup management tool from Microsoft, which is covered in detail in article Clean Boot Windows Using the Autoruns Utility. You may want to take a glance at that article before proceeding.

Download Autoruns and run it. Click the Scheduled Tasks tab and look at entries highlighted in yellow (which denotes missing file).

Look at the Image Path column and identify the entry you want to remove. Identifying the entry should be a pretty easy task; all you need to do is note down the file name and path shown in the error message and find the corresponding (highlighted) entry in Autoruns.

cannot find script file in ProgramData folder



Optionally, to gather more details about the entry, click the entry and look at the details section at the bottom, which shows the complete command-line or full set of arguments used by that entry.

cannot find script file in ProgramData folder

In this case, the complete command-line is:

"wscript.exe" "C:\ProgramData\{793791F4-29B5-4072-9833-30F048B1E37E}\1.9.3.1\rolo.txt" "433a2f50726f6772616d446174612f7b37393337393146342d323942352d343037322d393833332d3330463034384231453337457d2f312e392e332e312f726f74692e646c6c" "687474703a2f2f73616f2e7265716472652e636f6d2f" "--IsErIk" "//E:jscript"

Any file name or path that’s too long and has some obscure names is most likely added by malware. However, there may be exceptions which you need to watch out for.

After deleting the entry, you should no longer get the script error message referencing “ProgramData” at startup.

About the author

Ramesh Srinivasan founded Winhelponline.com back in 2005. He is passionate about Microsoft technologies and he has been a Microsoft Most Valuable Professional (MVP) for 10 consecutive years from 2003 to 2012.

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