How to Search for Files Created Between Two Dates in Windows

0 Shares

This post tells you how to use Windows Search to find files created, accessed or modified within a given date range, in all versions of Windows including Windows 10.

Search for files between a given date range

Windows 7 and higher

To search for files modified between two given dates, use this query syntax:

datemodified:‎4/‎1/‎2016 .. ‎4/‎15/‎2016

or

datemodified:>=‎4/‎1/‎2016<=‎4/‎15/‎2016

This lists files modified from April 1 to April 15, 2016.

But, how did I know that query string? How to use GUI to select a date range?

In the Search box, type one of these query syntax.

date:
datemodified:
dateaccessed:
datecreated:

Once you type that, you’ll be presented with the date picker dialog box which looks like this:

search for files within a date range

In this dialog, click the starting date, press the SHIFT key and click the end date. This creates a date range. You can also use SHIFT with the arrow keys to create the date range.

search for files within a date range

Once you select the range, the query syntax is applied in the search box, as below.

datemodified:‎4/‎1/‎2016 .. ‎4/‎15/‎2016

Windows Vista

In Windows XP you can use the Search Companion to search for files created or modified between two given dates. There is no such GUI option provided in Windows Vista, you can accomplish the same using Advanced Query Syntax (AQS). AQS is used by Windows Search to help users narrow or pin-point their searches. Searches can be narrowed by file type, kind, file property, file extension, date and other parameters.

To find files created between two given dates, use the following syntax:

date:>=10/8/2008<=10/15/2008

This lists all files that were created between Oct 8 and Oct 15, 2008.

Examples

To find files that were modified between two dates, use the modified operator.

modified:>=10/8/2008<=10/15/2008

To only find text documents (.txt) that were created or modified after a certain date (10/14/2008), you use:

modified:>10/14/2008 ext:.txt

For more information about the Advanced Query Syntax, read post Advanced search techniques at the Windows Team Blog. You can combine as many operators as you can to refine the search results per your needs.

0 Shares

About the author

Ramesh Srinivasan founded Winhelponline.com back in 2005. He is passionate about Microsoft technologies and has a vast experience in the ITeS industry — delivering support for Microsoft's consumer products. He has been a Microsoft MVP [2003 to 2012] who contributes to various Windows support forums.