Problem Steps Recorder (PSR) to be discontinued in Creators Update

steps recorder (psr) header

The Steps Recorder tool (previously named “Problem Steps Recorder”) PSR.EXE which was first introduced in Windows 7, is a handy program to record the steps for reproducing a problem in Windows. This classic desktop program is going to be deprecated in the upcoming Creators Update for Windows 10.

In the Creators Update insider preview build 15014, launching PSR shows the following message during the first run:

Source: OnMsft.com

Steps Recorder is no longer supported and will be removed from Windows soon. You’ll still be able to record your screen by pressing the Windows key + G.

Would you like to learn more?

steps recorder psr discontinued





When you click Yes, you’re taken to the Recording Game Clips | Game DVR page at Microsoft site, which explains how to record video clips using Game DVR.

steps recorder psr discontinued

After showing the deprecation message, the Steps Recorder does run, and works correctly (in Build 15014). Microsoft suggests using Game DVR (Winkey + G) to capture the steps instead.

However, Game DVR is for a different purpose and can’t be a replacement for Steps Recorder. Game DVR can only record videos or take screenshots. Whereas PSR records the problem steps with screenshots embedded into a MHTML file with base64 encoding — it also records the window name, class and other useful info. Here is a sample MTHML report generated by Steps Recorder:

Steps Recorder (PSR) MHTML report
Steps Recorder (PSR) MHTML report.

Sad to see PSR go!

About the author

Ramesh Srinivasan founded Winhelponline.com back in 2005. He is passionate about Microsoft technologies and has a vast experience in the ITeS industry — delivering support for Microsoft's consumer products. He has been a Microsoft MVP [2003 to 2012] who contributes to various Windows support forums.

2 thoughts on “Problem Steps Recorder (PSR) to be discontinued in Creators Update

  1. @Russell: That’s true. Many users aren’t aware of PSR or Reliability Monitor. It would have been nice if MS retained PSR (although it’s rarely used, but it’s one of its kind). Enterprises can configure Policies to prevent certain apps from loading, anyway.

  2. Probably another one of the Windows features that tech support uses but consumers don’t so Microsoft thinks it’s “not used”. The fact is that many businesses choose not to send full usage data to Microsoft about Windows Enterprise versions so the data they receive is skewed to consumers who don’t have such policies available. Obviously why Microsoft took the Start menu away until they received enough feedback that it was actually very much used and needed. They could avoid tons of hating by checking in with their Enterprise customers before deciding on major changes.

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